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Ask a Firefighter a question...like the "Ask a Police Officer" thread.

I'll start...

Where's WeeMan?

:smile:
 

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Why do firemen climb ontop of a burning building and cut a hole into the roof? I know it's to vent the building, but I thought that you wanted to starve the fires access to oxygen. So how does this help?
 

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i'm not a firefighter but i'll take a stab at it. i think they do it so they can see the smoke and how the fire might act. denton fire vents several different ways, i don't know what they are called but opening windows was one, lol. i think that you do want to starve the fire from oxygen but then when the firefighters go in you don't want them to have a backdraft issue so cutting a hole in the roof is a good way to vent the smoke and heat. heat rises so naturally the heat should decrease when the roof is opened up. i have heard that cutting a hole in the roof is a last resort.

I think being a firefighter is awesome. They get to drive that awesome truck or ride in it and all the kids and adults love them because they don't give them tickets, lol. the firefighters in denton are great guys. we play football games at least once a year and softball benefiting different organizations. no hostility between fire and pd in denton.
 

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DavidMidgley said:
Why do firemen climb ontop of a burning building and cut a hole into the roof? I know it's to vent the building, but I thought that you wanted to starve the fires access to oxygen. So how does this help?

FDWheelMan = Fire Department Wheel Man... Over 6 years in a paid dept.. Little over 3 as a driver...

Answer:

Firemen climb onto the roof of a burning building an cut a hole so that they can ventilate the smoke, heat, and gases trapped in the building.

This may not make sense at first... But when we cut the roof, and the heat escapes, the smoke will follow, exposing what is left of the flames, enabling us to extinguish the fire quicker. On top of the ventilation for quicker extinguishing, it actually helps to "save" the structure by letting potential hazards out before they really become hazards. The venting brings the temperatures of the structure down as well which helps prevent, or relieve conditions that can lead to backdraft or flashover.

There are quite a few schools of thought on venting... All are benefical..

Does this answer the question?
 

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Yes, that most certainly described what I thought/guessed at. But, it's better to get the unvarnished truth from an authority. thank you!:smile:
 

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right here colin been at the firehouse the last 3 days. to add on to FDwheelman we cut holes in the roof to also provide better visibility when the smoke and heat go thru the hole we see better!! ya there are many types of ventilation, vertical, horizontal, hydualic(sp?) so on and so forth.
 

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WeeMan97 said:
right here colin been at the firehouse the last 3 days. to add on to FDwheelman we cut holes in the roof to also provide better visibility when the smoke and heat go thru the hole we see better!! ya there are many types of ventilation, vertical, horizontal, hydualic(sp?) so on and so forth.
I did forget that part... :)

(I hope I have the next two right, but I don't have the book with me, it's at the station, so I might get the direction backwards but the idea is the same)

Vertical Ventilation is what it's called when we cut the roof and vent the smoke and gases out through the high spot...

Horizontal Ventilation is done more with the assistance of mother nature by opening of the windows and doors and hoping for a breeze... It is also used in conjunction with Vertical, and most commonly used in the initial stages of fire attack.

Hydraulic Ventilation is done with a hose line on what we call a "medium" fog pattern, the object is to sit a few feet back from the window and open the nozzle into the open window. This is done from the inside. The pattern creates a vacuum behind it that pulls air towards the flow of water. Essentially what it does is pull the heat and smoke out of the room.

Positive Pressure Ventilation is done with a fan. You take the fan, and with the air current it produces "cover" the doorway, forcing air into the structure. With the doors of the rooms, and windows of the structure, you can control which way the smoke is going to be "pushed" out.

Negative Pressure Ventilation is also done with a fan, however, it sucks the air through the structure to "pull" the smoke out.

Natural Ventilation is when the fire has progressed to the point that it is through the roof. At this phase, there really is little reason to do an offensive attack and we go into a defensive stance, which is to protect the exposures around it while keeping it knocked down. This is most often referred to as a "Surround and drown"
 

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DavidMidgley said:
Yes, that most certainly described what I thought/guessed at. But, it's better to get the unvarnished truth from an authority. thank you!:smile:
Not quite an authority...

Experienced. :)

Working on my Instructor's Certification in April.

6 and a 1/2 years in the ghetto for a fireman is the same as 6.5 years in the ghetto for police. There are things I wished my eyes haven't seen.
 
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