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Discussion Starter #1
Sometime back when I was learning to drive, somebody told me that you need to push the clutch in before hitting the brake. I realize that most times you brake you'll be changing gears so you'll need it in anyway, but is it really necessary to apply the clutch when braking?

It's such a habit now, I don't know if I can stop, but just wondering.

Thanks.
 

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Your right it is a good habit to get into. But you can hit the brake with out putting in the clutch. When doing that you will get to a point where your RPS drop below a certain level were you will have to apply the clutch, otherwise you will stall the engine ( which could be bad while driving ). I would say if you get below 1,000 RPS then your car might start to shake just a little and then you will need to use the clutch.
 

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I don't depress the clutch when braking unless the speed requires a downshift or I am approaching a full stop, at which point I take it out of gear and release the clutch. Many times I downshift to slow down as alternative to or to supplement braking. It's an acquired technique, like heel and toe shifting.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What exactly is heel and toe shifting? I've often read it in magazines and all, but don't know what it is.

Thanks and pardon my lack of knowledge.
 

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Actually, you use the ball of your right foot to mash the brake, and the right side of your right foot to 'blip' the accelerator. This is done when braking for a turn, allowing you to blip the throttle in order to match revs for the next lower gear you are selecting, in order to smooth out the downshift. The clutch and tranny appreciate this. In a non-synchro 'racing' transmission, this is required along with double clutching to make the gear change without major grinding.

As far as stopping on the street, I only engage the clutch to put the car in neutral, then let the clutch back out while coasting or sitting at a light. To sit with the clutch in puts wear on the throw-out bearing. If I am slowing but don't need to stop or need a lower gear, I leave the clutch alone.
 

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One question about stopping, is it best to brake and down shift through each gear until you finally stop, OR is it best to put the car in neutral and use only the brakes to stop?
 

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Brakes are designed to stop the car. Transmissions and clutches are NOT designed to stop the car. If you have little or no brakes, then gear down the car, put your feet through the floorboard, whatever it takes to get stopped. Otherwise, let the brakes do their job. Pads and rotors are a lot cheaper than clutches, gears, valves, etc.
 

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Is it neccesaary to push the clutch to the flor when shifting? Some say yes and some say no. I just want to know what is good for my trans and clutch because i want to take care of it
 

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Thanks for the heel-and-toe explanation. I'm pickin' it up well now and can really feel the engine and trans mesh as one.

It's definately going to save my tranny.

Now I drive around thinking, "Input shaft rotate, input shaft rotate." Yea, I'm nuts, but it sure is fun!
 

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01Bullitt, I think what you are asking about is power shifting, and I have to defer to the drag race guys on that. We road racers use the clutch to shift. To me, if it wasn't necessary, a clutch pedal wouldn't be there. Yes, gears can be changed without it, but it sounds abusive to me.

The Bullitt is blessed with an excellent pedal relationship for heel and toe driving; better than most Porsches, right up there with BMW pedals. It's a great car to practice with.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bullitt4601, thanks for the heel and toe explanation; I've been wondering about that for about 10 years.

I tried it on my way home last night and I must need to limber up my ankles or something. My brake is up higher than the gas pedal (it's supposed to be I assume?). Should your foot be more horizontal (parallel to the road) or vertical. I guess I was thinking horizontal and wondering how you bent your ankle like that.

Thanks for the help.
 

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Your foot needs to be more or less vertical, angle it just enough so that the left side of your foot is on the brake and the right side is on the gas.

The brake is higher than the gas, but not when you are using the brake. Remember when you are doing this, you are slowing the car and preparing to shift to a lower gear. At street speeds, you will have to push the right side of your foot down some to blip the trottle, but at track speeds you are pushing that brake pedal a LOT harder, and don't have as far to reach the gas. How much 'blip' you need to make a smooth change is a matter of practice; I'm still learning that.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks again, Bullitt4601. I'll give it another try now.

And I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who wasn't sure about heel & toe.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: chud on 2001-10-04 10:38 ]</font>
 

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Shift without the clutch.
Not in a Bullitt. A lot of guys will say "Oh Yeah, you can shift without the clutch". O.K. For those whom haven't experienced a damaged trans, shifter forks, and many more $$$$ parts, have the person who said they can do it show you how in their new Bullitt. Doubt you'll have any takers. If you do take along a video cam with audio, history in the making; you'll have on film someone destroying a new trans. :smile: My own opinion of course. I let a guy do it in my SC 400hp GT. bad experience.
 

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<TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
On 2001-10-03 12:52, Bullitt4601 wrote:
Brakes are designed to stop the car. Transmissions and clutches are NOT designed to stop the car. If you have little or no brakes, then gear down the car, put your feet through the floorboard, whatever it takes to get stopped. Otherwise, let the brakes do their job. Pads and rotors are a lot cheaper than clutches, gears, valves, etc.
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>
So is it hard on the tranny to downshift when slowing down? I often do but I'll stop if it's hard on the car.
 

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Tracy, that's a good link that you shared.

As long as you're not trying to use the drivetrain to slow down the car (as if it were a diesel truck), you should be ok. I do pretty much the same thing, running down through the gears as I approach a turn. Good downshifting practice, and glorious sounds.
 

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Since we are on the subject of clutches and gear changes and synchronizing and other things transmission, will someone finally tell us all just exactly what, and how it is done, power shifting is??

By the way, I have never owned (MY daily driver) anything but manly manuals and have consistently always used the engine as an assist in breaking my car. Have never had to change clutches due to excessive wear AND it has had the added benefit of extending my brake life.
 
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