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We all should have bled our brakes by now and if we use the brakes enough to get things really hot (open track day etc.), we should be bleeding our brakes on a regular basis.

How many have tried the Speed Bleeders?
Like them? Any problems?

Tried the Griot's Garage One Man Brake Bleeder?

Any other products helpful? (not counting the wife unit)

Do you remove the wheel when you bleed the brakes?
 

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I have always removed the wheel, have used the One man bleeder, the old method with someone pumping the brake pedal. I will in the future get the speed bleeders, it has to be easier. Punk Lancelot has speed bleeders.
 

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Speed Bleeders

Brakes bled with wheels off.
I got plenty of plastic tubing that fits snug on the bleeder and a gallon jug with a small opening to hold the tubing.

Speed Bleeders paid for themselves the first time that I used them.
However, the speed bleeders are too much longer that the stock rear ones, and the insides of the wheel will hit the bleeder first, when changing tires. I could be careful myself, but not the dealer, as I still get oil changes at the dealer until mid 2009 for warranty.
I put the original bleeders into the rears after flushing.

The front speed bleeders remained in, but I think the bleeders are gumming up, as they did not seem to work as well as when new. I may need to clean them with solvent.

Also, I emptied the brake reservoir rather easily. I took a spray bottle with an adjustable spray and set it to a stream.
Then I submerged the suction tube in the brake reservoir and sprayed brake fluid into another container.
Then I filled the reservoir with new fluid, and began the brake flushing.

Passenger rear is furthest from the brake cylinder, flush first. Second, driver's side rear. Third, passenger front. Lastly, driver's side front. Good luck.
 

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Speed Bleeders

I have speed bleeders and they are great. Also the rears are a different size (length) than the fronts. I'll check the P/N's and post later.
I flush the fluid before any track days. In my other car once a year.
 

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I just replaced the brake fluid in my Mach1 last week.

I strongly recommend the Motive Products Power Bleeder.

I like the idea of putting new brake fluid into the system under pressure instead of sucking it out at the calipers. Speed Bleeders are O.K., but I prefer to have constant pressure force fluid through the lines instead of having to pump the brake pedal.

The Power Bleeder replaces the master cylinder cap with an adapter that's connected to tubing leading to a bug sprayer type tank. The tank has a pressure gauge and hand pump.

To use the unit, replace the master cylinder cap with the adapter and pressurize the empty tank to 20 psi to check for leaks. If you buy the unit with multiple adapters, you will need to use teflon tape on the in-line hose connection.

Once you are sure there are no leaks at the adapter or in-line connector, depressurize by unscrewing the pump handle at the tank.

Fill the tank with upto two quarts of brake fluid and pump to 15 psi. Attach a clear plastic tube to the RR bleeder and place the other end into a recepticle. I use a clear 16 oz. plastic bottle.

Unscrew the bleeder 1/4 to 1/2 turn and let the fluid drain into the bottle. Be patient. If you unscrew the bleeder to much, it will rock in its threads and air will work its way into the drain tube creating "false" bubbles.

For the RR, I bleed 16 oz. (Full drain bottle). Pump Power Bleeder back up to 15 psi and repeat on LR, RF, and LF. I bleed less fluid at each caliper because the lines get progressively shorter.

The Power Bleeder is as close to fool proof as you can get when bleeding brakes.

The only mistakes you can make are.

1. Pressurizing with fluid in the Power Bleeder without properly seating the connections.

2. Uncsrewing you bleeders too far and getting "false" air bubbles in your drain tube.

3. Running out of brake fluid in the Power Bleeder and pushing air into the master cylinder. (THIS IS WHY I USE A 16 OZ. DRAIN BOTTLE TO KEEP TRACK OF HOW MUCH FLUID I'VE BLED.)

I've read other's suggestions to suck as much old fluid out of the master cylinder as possible to reduce the amount of new fluid needed. No thanks, I'll pass.

Brake fluid is pretty cheap. I get ATE Super Blue / Type 200 for $9.95/$10.95 per liter with free shipping on 10 liters. I'd rather bee safe and maintain full fluid level in the master cylinder and not risk getting air into the system.

Using the Power Bleeder resulted in a super form pedal and eliminated the need to bleed the master cylinder.

I jacked up one corner of the car and removed and replaced each wheel one at at time. It took longer to jack and r & r each wheel than the actual bleeding procedure.

You will need the 3 PRONG FORD ADAPTER. I got lucky. the same adapter fits my F250 Powerstroke (no need to jack and take off wheels) and my 2005 Subaru Legacy GT.
 

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Good write-up. I actually bought the Power Bleeder last week, and I agree, this is money well spent. It almost makes changing brake fluid fun :) I haven't done the Bullitt yet, but did change it in my Super Duty today. I did pump out about 2/3 of the master cylinder reservoir first though. Piece of cake. I also bought 10 liters of ATE SB on ebay.
 

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I have done quite a bit of behind the counter stuff at my part-time job... I looked quite extensively at the Russell speed bleeders (as listed in the 01 Archives) I have found that the local parts stores (Advance/Vato Zone/Napa/O'Reilly's) carry an exact copy of that same part... It's not a Russell though, it's a HELP! part.

Part Number 12701. It's $9.88 at Advance.

I currently have all corners on my wife's GT set up and there is no issues. Couple more pieces for the Bullitt and I'll be ready for it's "flush and refurb"..
 
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