Mustang Bullitt Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I asked this in another post, but I think that none of the resident speed demons saw it perhaps... Just a curiosity. Here's a copy paste of the original Q.:

Question for those of you who have obviously spent more time at 100+ mph speeds than I...
Regarding the "lightness" of the rear that a couple of us mentioned, is this a reality or just the way it feels to someone not used to such speeds?
Obviously I know that humping around an exit ramp at 130 mph is probably not going to have a good ending. However, I actually get nervous at normal highway curves if I'm going over about 110, because I get the sensation that the rear is so light, it could just casually drift around on me, and honestly I doubt my ability to bring it back in at those kinds of speeds. What is traction really like at those speeds compared to what it feels like? Please note that I don't plan on spending large amounts of time at 100+ speeds or even 80+ speeds, but if I'm there I'd like to feel a bit more comfortable. My T'bird maxxed at 105 by computer, but damn it felt rock solid there just like I was doing 60mph.

Thanks!
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
I saw your post before, Joe. I have to admit my normal interstate driving speed has always been around 80 when I feel that I can get away with it. I like speed but I like control also. My foray into the mid-100's was on a straightaway rural road. When I do get a little crazy I try to do it where there is little or no liklihood of getting busted. So I guess I can't really answer your question. But interstate turns are banked so I would think they'd be OK at the 100-110mph range.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
Hi Joe,
I traded in a 95 T-Bird and so I know where you are coming form. Kind of scary when the injectors shot of at 110 in the T-bird wasn't it. Felt like the trans let go. Can't really compare the Bullitt to the Tbird though. At 110 the STK T-bird did not feel unsafe but you know there was nothing extra laying around, where as with the Bullitt you know there is just a lot more everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I can vouch for some solid handling through curves and lane changes at 95 to 100, but only time I've been over is in a straight line. Some lightness is normal, and very real, at high speeds. The front end would get hard to handle in my 69 fastback over 115. In a straight line, the aerodynamics of the car CAN help keep the car stable, depending on the design, hence the functional purpose of a spoiler to cause the air to apply downward pressure and help keep the car on the road(though lots of people use them to make their cars look silly). As you enter a curve, you start applying all that sideways g-force to the rubber and the suspension, plus the air is no longer running a straight line down your car.

I vaguely remember a test done in the 60's on one of the rolling steel bricks of the time, I think it was a Cadillac. This car, weighing over 2 tons, came across the scales at 100 MPH, and less than 200lbs per tire.

Short answer is, what you're feeling is real, strong crosswinds at those speeds can be deadly, and curves should be handled with caution. Driving on the edge can get the adreniline pumping, but only you can figure out when you're over the edge.

That's my 2 cents worth. Have fun and live a long life with your Bullitt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input all! I'm happy to have some facts about it, but honestly a bit scared to find out that it was really as light as it felt! :eek:

Mid Life Crisis: I miss my Thunderbird dearly! It was a '95 as well, and I put a new engine in last August (stock replacement, but great learning experience for me with some help from a friend) only to total it after a late December snowfall. While obviously the Bullitt outperforms it, I'll never stop missing that car. 5+ years of driving the same car provides a bond that you just can't get in 1500 miles. I knew that car like the back of my hand. (Though obviously not quite well enough since I let a small amount of ice on the road get me.)

If I ever have the $$ and a reasonable opportunity to get another one, I will.

OTOH, if I hadn't totalled it, I wouldn't be driving a Bullitt now, because I'd still have that car and be just as in love with it as I was then.

Joe
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top