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I have been finding a few drops of brake fluid on top of the reservoir after longer cruises. I only have 470 miles on the car.

My guess is that it might have been overfilled at the factory. The level is at the top of the little "MAX" arrow. I think when the fluid gets hot, it expands, then weeps out between the top of the reservoir and the cap.

Now that I've monitored this for a few weeks, I am going to take a little bit of fluid out and bring it down to the point (or bottom) on the MAX arrow.

Anyone else experience this?
 

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Unfortunately this seems to be a fairly common thing with some S197 Mustangs. My old 05 did this. Last time I took my 05 in regarding the brake fluid issue the service manager told me the official Ford solution. Their solution... just like you indicated they recommended that the dealer lower the brake fluid level a little.

If I recall correctly I finally resolved the problem by installing an appropriately sized o-ring inside the brake reservoir cap.
 

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I had the same drops. I opened and wiped out the cap a couple of times and it always seemed loose to me. I tried putting it on from a couple of different starting points and I found an orientation that was tighter and I haven't gotten any more drops.
 

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Big Daddy said:
Is it the same reservoir or is this something Ford did not get right the second time?
Not sure if it is the matching number reservoir between the 2 years but they appear simlar.... I just figured the brake seriving guy/gal on the assembly line overfilled them just a little....


This has nothing to do with the excess fluid on our new cars but a little info when the pads require changing;
As the pads wear and the calpers pistons move out the fluid level will drop and will require servicing.

This addition of fluid will come back to haunt you, because when you replace the worn out pads with the "C" clamps depressing the caliper pistons, the fluid will be pushed back into the reservior causing the excess fluid to be released out the vent in the cap....

Best thing to do is to drain/bleed the fluid when pads are changed replaceing the old nassty fluid with clean, new, dry fluid. In fact it is recommeded that brake fluid should be replaced every 5 years because of mosture, heat and dirt. I replace my DOT 3 with DOT 4, DOT 4 will mix with DOT 3, and has higher boiling point so hard braking will not be as much of problem with DOT 4 (like on road course, or delievering the mail).....

I put DOT 4 in my CVPI because it was mail car because about half way though the mail route my brakes where being cooked
and DOT 3 in it was causing a spongey peddle, swapped over to DOT 4 and that issue went away.

DOT 5 will not mix with DOT 3 or 4 will require complete flushing of brake system to use, high end high performance and race cars use DOT5


JUSSSSST a little brake information... sorry
 

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Jimmy Ray said:
This addition of fluid will come back to haunt you, because when you replace the worn out pads with the "C" clamps depressing the caliper pistons, the fluid will be pushed back into the reservior causing the excess fluid to be released out the vent in the cap....
Oooh - you should NEVER push the fluid "back up into the system" - ever.

That's what the bleeder-screw is for: crack it whenever you're "pushing back" any pads or calipers.

I've seen perfectly-functioning ABS units suddenly fail after the mechanic did this, and heard tales of mechanics replacing ABS units over and over and over because they're using the unit as an expensive "filter" for old fluid and line-debris.

ALWAYS use the bleeder screw - even in non-ABS-equipped vehicles.
 

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The caps are vented, so if the reservoir is slightly over filled, and brake fluid warm from engine compartment heat etc, it's not unusual for some to have a chance to weep through the cap vent
 

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JC2954 said:
Oooh - you should NEVER push the fluid "back up into the system" - ever.

That's what the bleeder-screw is for: crack it whenever you're "pushing back" any pads or calipers.

I've seen perfectly-functioning ABS units suddenly fail after the mechanic did this, and heard tales of mechanics replacing ABS units over and over and over because they're using the unit as an expensive "filter" for old fluid and line-debris.

ALWAYS use the bleeder screw - even in non-ABS-equipped vehicles.
Been doing that way for YEARS, figured it wasn't good for the master cylinder, didn't think of the ABS guess I have been lucky.... I still would rather drain and replace with new fliud anyway....
 
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