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But of them comes and goes irregularly and is quite annoying: Can you hear it from 00:05? (Unfortunately, it starts just when the mechanic starts talking :) ... Is it the pump? It is rather a higher tone sort of knocking...

I am heading to visit a dealer on Wednesday for some diagnostics as engine icon appeared and disappeared for a short time last week.. I will mention this noise, but if you guys have any thoughts? ... I don`t think it`s a big deal, but hey, I would rather hear these kind of noises when the car is 150K, not 1K :-D

Hard to hear it in the video. I've watched a number of videos and found the sounds to not be noticeable enough, probably because phone mics can't pick up the sound well. That said, the new 5.0L has some more mechanical noises, and just like those who have been buying '18 Mustang GTs for the past year, I think we will have to accept some noise as "normal", while keeping ears open if some sound increases in frequency, volume, or changes in tone.


It's also possible that some of the noise might be getting through since the Bullitt's have no large plastic engine cover with sound deadening liner like the GTs do. There is something to damp the injector noise on the Bullitts, but the cover might be removing other sounds from parts of the fuel injection system we hear.


In the meantime, enjoy your car and make sure you get it registered on our '19 registry by completing this form.
 
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Discussion Starter #22
So when I started this thread I was just asking a question and shortly thereafter I had my “anomaly “. So I appologize if I seem to have turned into one of the chronic Debbie Downers, because that ain’t me!

So an anomaly update: over the last three days I have made it a point to take her out and drive her. Around town, in traffic and on the highway, at varying speeds. And I can report back that she is running like a champ. Still gonna check for any codes, but not worrying about it too much. I really haven’t been able to drive her very much since purchasing on September 9th. As of three days ago I had about 500 miles, but I have driven another 400 since then.
 

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So when I started this thread I was just asking a question and shortly thereafter I had my “anomaly “. So I appologize if I seem to have turned into one of the chronic Debbie Downers, because that ain’t me!

So an anomaly update: over the last three days I have made it a point to take her out and drive her. Around town, in traffic and on the highway, at varying speeds. And I can report back that she is running like a champ. Still gonna check for any codes, but not worrying about it too much. I really haven’t been able to drive her very much since purchasing on September 9th. As of three days ago I had about 500 miles, but I have driven another 400 since then.

Thanks for sharing your experiences. We are all on a learning curve here, although we do have the benefit of the people who bought model year 2018 Mustang GTs to give us insights.
 

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Mine sounds tight at idle with no tick that I can detect (1,200 miles on it so far).
I have noticed since day one a light sewing machine rattle while cruising at lower rpms (around 2,000) that goes away if you give it more gas or let off the throttle completely.
I’ve been trying to decide if that’s normal or not, like typical injector or valve adjuster noise.
I’m keeping my fingers crossed. Car drives better and better as I break it in. 🙂
 

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Pat (bullit4404) has posted a thread discussing the Fuel Injection systems (yes, more than one system on this car).

2019 Fuel Injections Systems

Very interesting discussion which may explain some of the additional sounds you are heading on the new Bullitt. With all of these systems working in conjunction with each other, no wonder you are hearing these noises which change based upon RPM. One system switching on or off depending upon RPM. The amount of pressure they are under. I sure hope Ford got it right. Also something to consider when planning any engine mods. Modding is no longer for the "shade tree" mechanic. You have to be a computer expert too.
 
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Thank you for the link!
That answers my question perfectly. Yes, it does sound very diesel-like, so the injectors are likely the source, especially since it sounds like it’s coming from the top-end. 😉
Thanks again. 🙂
 

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I have noticed since day one a light sewing machine rattle while cruising at lower rpms (around 2,000) that goes away if you give it more gas or let off the throttle completely.
I’ve been trying to decide if that’s normal or not, like typical injector or valve adjuster noise.

What you describe is similar to what I have experienced. It's possible that it's injector noise. There's also been a TSB issued for the 5.0L in the F-150 that describes a calibration change to quiet the cam phasers down, however, the automatic transmission is mentioned. Some think it is piston slap because the '18+ 5.0L engines use the same "spray on" cylinder liner that the 5.2L Voodoo engines do, with those 5.2Ls exhibiting piston slap noise until warmed.


I will say this - in this car, I'd pick the non-engine cover look over the noise, assuming it stays at the level and frequency that it does.
 
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Interesting, thanks for the info. I did take note today that it goes away after the engine is thoroughly warmed up..... don’t know if that’s good or bad.
If it’s the injectors, I would think it would always do it, but then again its fuel requirements are different after warming up.
It sounds like it’s coming from the top end and I crawled under the car while cold and warm and it’s smooth. No ticks or rattles from the engine block at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
It’s nice to see additional input coming in now to my original question! I am now at just under 1200 miles and she runs and pulls like a beast. I believe that because these cars ar so hi tech and fly by wire, that there are some truths to all the paranoia over the clicking and clucking these cars do. I had previously made some statements regarding my belief that these cars are somewhat temperamental when cold. I still believe that wholeheartedly. I try to let her get to operating temperature, she just runs better. I also had made an observation regarding how some owners are changing the oil in the cars very early and way before the first recommended change. I asked about the oils possibly having some kind of addative in the oil during the initial break in. I have heard in one of the many postings on one of these sites that there may be some truth to that, but who knows. I just think that as an engine breaks in it needs the initial oil to break down and penetrate into the the parts to create fluid movement between the parts. And that maybe changing it to soon does not allow that to happen. All I know is that I allow her to warm up and then I drive her. While I do not race or abuse her, I let her run. I am very happy with the car I got and I simply refuse to worry about it until I have a reason to. So pay attention, but drive. Plan some long drives and enjoy! Happy New Year to all!
 

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Tim
You and I come from a time of carburetors and ignition points. These cars are more computer than drive train. Some new cars can have as many as 10 or more ECM's. Timothy may have had a engine miss code from that lousy California gas, who knows. But, as you say, it kinda makes you wonder what's going on. Certainly wouldn't hurt to see if there are codes present. BTW, if you check your OBD II car, don't be surprised if you find codes. Even changing the battery can store a couple.

Yep. you are right, we are used to those carbs and points!! Funny, when I talk to some mechanics nowadays they don't even know what I am talking about much less know what a dwell meter is for!!!!!!!still have mine (and timing light) as well as the flex shaft adjuster for gm distributors!!!! antiques now.
 
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I asked about the oils possibly having some kind of addative in the oil during the initial break in. I have heard in one of the many postings on one of these sites that there may be some truth to that, but who knows.
Tim, yes the cars have a break-in oil. Break-in oil is not something that comes straight out of a bottle. When the engine is assembled, they use assembly lube on several critical parts. Once the engine runs the first time, the oil circulating through the engine picks up the assembly lube additives and that creates the break-in oil.
 
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Hi,
Just got my new 19 Bullitt delivered but unfortunately it will have to ”sleep” in my garage until the snow is gone in a couple of months.
This discussion about engine tick and other noises reminds me of my Porsche 911 (997) with the Messger twin turbo. This engine was originally concived for racing and is famous for beeing absolutely bullitproof :)-). The idle noise from this engine is terrible. At least the first time you hear it, after a while you actually come to like it as part of its ”personality”. Its hard to describe but it sounds like a can full of nuts and bolts that you rattle. And on top of this a special tick that varies with rpm.
Of course when you drive it hard the fantastic roar is all you hear but at idle its not what you would expect from a supercar.
So, as long as there are no issues connected with ticks and other noises from the Bullitt engine I will not be worried. There are a lot of things going on in modern engines and some noise may not be beautiful but still sign of a reliable piece of engineering.
 

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Hi,
Just got my new 19 Bullitt delivered but unfortunately it will have to ”sleep” in my garage until the snow is gone in a couple of months.
This discussion about engine tick and other noises reminds me of my Porsche 911 (997) with the Messger twin turbo. This engine was originally concived for racing and is famous for beeing absolutely bullitproof (<img src="http://www.imboc.com/forums/images/smilies/icon_smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />. The idle noise from this engine is terrible. At least the first time you hear it, after a while you actually come to like it as part of its ”personality”. Its hard to describe but it sounds like a can full of nuts and bolts that you rattle. And on top of this a special tick that varies with rpm.
Of course when you drive it hard the fantastic roar is all you hear but at idle its not what you would expect from a supercar.
So, as long as there are no issues connected with ticks and other noises from the Bullitt engine I will not be worried. There are a lot of things going on in modern engines and some noise may not be beautiful but still sign of a reliable piece of engineering.
Actually that does remind me of the two 996 Boxsters I once had. One was a daily driver that was driven very hard for almost 200,000 miles. The insulation blanket was missing from the engine cover so I could hear the engine a bit more from inside. It had a fair amount of valvetrain chatter, fuel system clicks, and intake whine.
They both had little minor ticks and rattles you could hear from the outside when cold.
They also fell under the so called “dreaded IMS bearing” that supposedly had a design flaw that would kill the engine if it failed.
There was so much internet doomsaying hype over this that lots of 996-997 owners got paranoid that their car was a ticking time bomb ready to explode anytime!
Ultimately less than 3% of the engines ever failed over several model years, and my two well used Boxsters were solid as a rock and never let me down.
That’s why I’m going to try not to worry about my 5.0 until there’s an issue with it, if there ever is.
I have a 10 year 100,000 mile bumper to bumper, and free engines for life from my dealer to further ease my mind.
 

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Update:
The 2019 Bullitt still sounds quiet at idle and cruising, but at nearly 1400 miles the feint diesel clatter at 2000 rpm is quickly getting more prominent.
Cold or warm (a bit worse cold), 1500-3500 rpm in any gear at any speed, as long as its under light to moderate acceleration between 1500-3500 rpm.
It’s really getting me depressed.
Still, the earliest the dealer can get to it is Thurs, I asked for a boroscope inspection.

The oil is still full and clear.
I followed all the break-in procedures and didn’t modify or abuse it in any way. Even now after break-in, I rarely go over 3,500 rpms and have never had it over 5,000rpms.

I’ll post what the dealer’s shop turns up.
Right now I’m not sure what to do. Clearly from the reports a replacement engine will be pointless. A buyback will probably come at a slight monetary loss and after trading in my Mercedes and Porsche for this thing I’d just be left with my work beater car (which is a 2003 Mustang GT with 162,000 miles and NO ticks or rattles at all). Camaros and Challengers don’t really do it for me as replacements.
Hopefully the shop will turn up noninternal damage.... but the noise is still disconcerting.
 

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There's a lot of stuff "ticking." The trick is knowing what is bad.
Cut open your oil filter, especially after the first oil change. Tony sends his oil for analysis, me likey.
It wouldn't hurt to run 5W30 oil in the warm weather. As previously stated, I prefer Full synthetic oil.
He referenced piston slap. Pistons are not perfectly round when cold. As the engine warms, they swell, becoming rounder. A little piston slap when cold is not terrible since the skirts are usually coated or machined to be "slippy;" as long as it quiets down when the engine reaches operating temperature.
I had a Subaru that had cold piston slap from day one and we drove it 14 years, before the body returned to mother earth.
In summary; DI pumps, injectors, cam phasers, mechanical noises, OK. Metal in the oil, low oil pressure, high oil consumption, loud noises that don't go away; cause for concern. Remember, two engines in one!
 

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This is a more specific video that was posted on Mustang6g if you are experiencing similar to what Retroman1969 is hearing (I also have it too). The bottom line theory in this video is that manufacturing variances in the block and pistons, especially with the spray bore technology in use, are resulting in a noise, especially because of the expansion rate of an aluminum block. Those of us who were on here when the first Bullitt model came out might remember something called the "death rattle" back in the day. If memory serves, the piston material would expand when warmed up and it would go away, or in some cases, it didn't. I could be wrong about that because I didn't go back and look in the '01 sections. I actually joined this forum because I had a '00 GT at the time that had this rattle noise.


Retroman1969, don't jump ship yet!! I am going to hang in there with this car because this noise aside, it's been phenomenal. By the way, I do let my '19 warm up for a couple of minutes (never thought I'd be doing that again, and yes, I know it's not good for the environment). By the way, as compelling as this sounds, the other theory about the cam tensioners is still out there too. Again, until Ford release any formal information, take this with a grain of salt and don't let it scare you away!


Bullitt4404, thanks for your summarzation of what to really watch out for, based on your mechanic experience.



https://youtu.be/oBcYKKDybqk?t=669
 
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