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Just stopped by my local BP today to gas my truck and noticed a sign stating "up to 10 percent Ethanol". I know that my gas cap on my 08 Bullitt states that "Ford recommends BP", but I have also seen (either on the gas lid or owners manual or both)that I shouldn't use gas containing Ethanol in my Bullitt. Anyone else having this issue? The woman at the counter told me that "They are making everyone put Ethanol in their gas as of June 1". What is a concerned Bullitt owner to do? :evil:
 

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She is correct. They are phasing out the other additives they used to use. There will be very few if any places to get gas without ethanol soon. I don't think Ford says not to use ethanol since in some areas of the US it is vurtually impossible to get gas without ethanol. .
 

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Ford says not to use E85-blend gasoline in the Bullitt - which is 85% Ethanol (sez not-to right on the fuel cap BTW). Can't hardly get-away from some corn-juice blend, 'specially in the Corn Belt states (MO made it Law that all the fuel sold in the State MUST have at least 10% Ethanol)
 

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You should have no problems. For quite a few years here in Illinois here you can't get 100% gas anywhere, but I've had no issues at all. As to drop in gas mileage, it's possible, but I have nothing to compare it to.
 

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Charles
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The Unhomed said:
You should have no problems. For quite a few years here in Illinois here you can't get 100% gas anywhere, but I've had no issues at all. As to drop in gas mileage, it's possible, but I have nothing to compare it to.
The change to a higher mix of ethanol in the summer here in Houston. Tom's right, my mileage dropped by a couple MPG.
 

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I understand that Shell and I think it was Mobil don't yet. Haven't tried them.

As I posted in another thread, according to a chemical engineer I spoke to, ethanol is not good for your car. It does reduce mileage due to a different burn rate, it is more of a solvent than gas and thus will send gunk thru your system and with any kind of moisture, it creates a mild acidic acid that is not good for rubber components and can etch aluminum.
 

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It reduces gas mileage.
 

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Ethanol is a bad mistake by the U S Government. All we need to do is start drilling everywhere, from Florida to Alaska. While we develop and use these resources we keep money at home and apply that savings to alternative energy sources. people say we cannot drill our way out of this mess, maybe not completely, and not quick enough but what is wrong with us for not starting to become the country we forgot 100 years ago one more time. I have read that just along the continental shelf surrounding Florida there is enough oil to run America for the next 45 years.

Oh one more thing, in Anwr (not sure how to spell this), we only need to drill on a measly 2,000 acres. That is about 3 square miles, come on what in the world are we as a people thinking? There are so many untouched resources it is frightening to think what we could do if we were allowed to go after them. Someone better start to think in the USA and quick. We are on the verge of losing everything our country once was, past tense. I know most of you must agree. God I hope I am not the only one that feels this way, but I wonder sometimes.
 

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Looks like about a 3% loss in fuel economy.

In theory, all fuel-driven vehicles have a fuel economy (measured as miles per US gallon, or liters per 100 km) that is directly proportional to the fuel's energy content.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[27]</sup>In reality, there are many other variables that come in to play that affect the performance of a particular fuel in a particular engine. Ethanol contains approx. 34% less energy per unit volume than gasoline, and therefore in theory, burning pure ethanol in a vehicle will result in a 34% reduction in miles per US gallon, given the same fuel economy, compared to burning pure gasoline. This assumes that the octane ratings of the fuels, and the thus the engine's ability to extract energy from the fuels, are the same.<sup id="cite_ref-EEREFAQ_13-1" class="reference">[14]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-EIAATTF_14-1" class="reference">[15]</sup> For E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline), the effect is small (~3%) when compared to conventional gasoline,<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[28]</sup> and even smaller (1-2%) when compared to oxygenated and reformulated blends.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[29]</sup> However, for E85 (85% ethanol), the effect becomes significant. E85 will produce lower mileage than gasoline, and will require more frequent refueling. Actual performance may vary depending on the vehicle. The EPA-rated mileage of current USA flex-fuel vehicles<sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference">[30]</sup> should be considered when making price comparisons, but it must be noted that E85 is a high performance fuel, with an octane rating of about 104, and should be compared to premium. In one estimate<sup id="cite_ref-bourne_30-0" class="reference">[31]</sup> the US retail price for E85 ethanol is 2.62 US dollar per gallon or 3.71 dollar corrected for energy equivalency compared to a gallon of gasoline priced at 3.03 dollar. Brazilian cane ethanol (100%)is priced at 3.88 dollar against 4.91 dollar for E25 (figures July 2007).

How's this. Brazil is now energy independent due to their early investment in the use of ethanol.

Brazil has the largest and most successful bio-fuel programs in the world, involving production of ethanol fuel from sugar cane, and it is considered to have the world's first sustainable biofuels economy.<sup id="cite_ref-Wilson_34-0" class="reference">[35]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Apollo_35-0" class="reference">[36]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-NYT100406_36-0" class="reference">[37]</sup> In 2006 Brazilian ethanol provided around 20% of the country's road transport sector fuel consumption needs, and more than 40% of fuel consumption for the light vehicle fleet.<sup id="cite_ref-BEN2007_37-0" class="reference">[38]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Brazil48_20_38-0" class="reference">[39]</sup> <sup id="cite_ref-Apollo_35-1" class="reference">[36]</sup> As a result of the increasing use of ethanol, together with the exploitation of domestic deep water oil sources, Brazil, which years ago had to import a large share of the petroleum needed for domestic consumption, in 2006 reached complete self-sufficiency in oil supply.<sup id="cite_ref-39" class="reference">[40]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-40" class="reference">[41]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-41" class="reference">[42]</sup> Together, Brazil and the United States lead the industrial world in global ethanol production, accounting together for 70% of the world's production<sup id="cite_ref-WasPos1_42-0" class="reference">[43]</sup> and nearly 90% of ethanol used for fuel. <sup id="cite_ref-WorldBank_43-0" class="reference">[44]</sup> In 2006 Brazil produced 16.3 billion liters (4.3 billion U.S. liquid gallons),<sup id="cite_ref-RFA1E_31-2" class="reference">[32]</sup> which represents 33.3% of the world's total ethanol production and 42% of the world's ethanol used as fuel.<sup id="cite_ref-WorldBank_43-1" class="reference">[44]</sup> Sugar cane plantations cover 3.6 million hectares of land for ethanol production, representing just 1% of Brazil's arable land, with a productivity of 7,500 liters of ethanol per hectare, as compared with the U.S. maize ethanol productivity of 3,000 liters per hectare.<sup id="cite_ref-Veja_30_04_44-0" class="reference">[45]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Wilson_34-1" class="reference">[35]</sup>
Production and use of ethanol has been stimulated through:
<dl><dd>
  • Low-interest loans for the construction of ethanol distilleries
  • Guaranteed purchase of ethanol by the state-owned oil company at a reasonable price
  • Retail pricing of neat ethanol so it is competitive if not slightly favorable to the gasoline-ethanol blend
  • Tax incentives provided during the 1980s to stimulate the purchase of neat ethanol vehicles.<sup id="cite_ref-aceee_45-0" class="reference">[46]</sup>
</dd></dl> Guaranteed purchase and price regulation were ended some years ago, with relatively positive results. In addition to these other policies, ethanol producers in the state of São Paulo established a research and technology transfer center that has been effective in improving sugar cane and ethanol yields.<sup id="cite_ref-aceee_45-1" class="reference">[46]</sup>
There are no longer light vehicles in Brazil running on pure gasoline. Since 1977 the government made mandatory to blend 20% of ethanol (E20) with gasoline (gasohol), requiring just a minor adjustment on regular gasoline motors. Today the mandatory blend is allowed to vary nationwide between 20% to 25% ethanol (E25) and it is used by all regular gasoline vehicles, plus three million cars running on 100% anhydrous ethanol and five million of dual or flexible-fuel vehicles. The Brazilian car manufacturing industry developed full flexible-fuel vehicles that can run on any proportion of gasoline and ethanol.<sup id="cite_ref-CEPAL_46-0" class="reference">[47]</sup> Introduced in the market in 2003, these vehicles became a commercial success.<sup id="cite_ref-ICIS_47-0" class="reference">[48]</sup> On March 2008, the fleet of "flex" cars and light commercial vehicles had reached 5 million new vehicles sold.<sup id="cite_ref-Globo1_48-0" class="reference">[49]</sup> which represents around 10% of Brazil's motor vehicle fleet and 15.6% of all light vehicles.<sup id="cite_ref-49" class="reference">[50]</sup> The ethanol-powered and "flex" vehicles, as they are popularly known, are manufactured to tolerate hydrated ethanol, an azeotrope comprised of 95.6% ethanol and 4.4% water.<sup id="cite_ref-Ethanol_50-0" class="reference">[51]</sup>
This is where we should be headed, away from corn based ethanol and toward other types like cane.

<sup id="cite_ref-Ethanol_50-0" class="reference">
</sup>
 

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hickdaddy71 said:
I've seen some television that shows how Brazil does this. I think you are right Greg, there must be places in the southern US close enough to the equator to grow sugar.
It works great in cars but if you drive too much you will develop cavities.
 

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maybe if we bomb Brazil, we can take their sugar gas? :bigguns:

i know it failed in Iraq, but maybe this time around? :p :p :p

all kidding aside, i just hate that these govt a-holes put ethanol in the tanks to try and save our gas reserves, but instead cost us more money by reducing our mileage, and making us fix the gunking issues in our cars every month...

shaun
 

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droopysbullitt said:
This is where we should be headed, away from corn based ethanol and toward other types like cane.
Great post.

Yes Brazil has done it using a crop that is not a staple like corn. And everytime I hear the corn con group say they are striving to reduce US dependence on mideast oil I want to shoot somebody. If that were true, the US Congress would ignore the corn lobby and remove the tariffs on Brazilian ethanol that are currently in place. The corn con ain't about reducing mideast oil imports... its about fattening their pockets at the expense of their fellow citizens.

Used to be USA farmers were loyal to the USA. (Half of my family were midwest farmers so I am not speaking out of turn.)

Remove the tariffs on imported Brazilian ethanol NOW! :exclaim:

If there's an excess crop of corn after FOOD needs are provided for, make ethanol from corn. But until then it is a threat to our national security and the economic survival of USA families to use FOOD for FUEL and at the same time prohibit Brazilian ethanol.

Congress makes me puke! :mad:

PS: Isn't FORD very active in Brazil? If so, they already know how to make the USA fleet capable for flex fuel. Why aren't they?
 

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SniperStang said:
maybe if we bomb Brazil, we can take their sugar gas? :bigguns:

shaun
Shaun,
At first thought it was a good idea - but then realized I would miss the Brazialian girls in thongs :drool2: and that great Brazilian jazz! :goodvibe: Not worth it - let em keep the sweets!
 
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