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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Where I live there is an area where the roads are long, windy, smooth, seperated by a fairly wide median and no cross streets. Traffic is usually nonexistent. Obviously streets put in for future development and sometime I will drive out there to play. I have noticed it takes a fair amount of strength to upshift and downshift with the Hurst. With normal driving (not stressing or loading the trans) the Hurst will up and down shift easily and precisely but then again I am not stressing the trans or engine. In other words, I can shift easily, sometimes only using one finger. It is a different story when driving aggressively up through the gears. Is this normal to require a strong pull or push on the stick to shift when running in the upper RPMs?
I have watched guys shifting in Mustangs on road courses (video and TV) and the shift is short and obviously doesn't require a great deal of strength. In fact, it looks effortless. I really like the look of my Hurst but perhaps I should consider a different shifter? What do you think?

One more question, I have noticed after driving my car for a while the stickshift will get warm, sometimes very, very, warm. I am not mechanically inclined so I wonder if it was installed correctly by the dealer mechanics? If it is cold or wet outside, the stick stays tolerable but on a warm day it gets very warm, or even hot. It doesn't seem right that the stick would get so warm/hot while driving in town. What do you think?
 

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wmiles said:
Where I live there is an area where the roads are long, windy, smooth, seperated by a fairly wide median and no cross streets. Traffic is usually nonexistent. Obviously streets put in for future development and sometime I will drive out there to play. I have noticed it takes a fair amount of strength to upshift and downshift with the Hurst. With normal driving (not stressing or loading the trans) the Hurst will up and down shift easily and precisely but then again I am not stressing the trans or engine. In other words, I can shift easily, sometimes only using one finger. It is a different story when driving aggressively up through the gears. Is this normal to require a strong pull or push on the stick to shift when running in the upper RPMs?
I have watched guys shifting in Mustangs on road courses (video and TV) and the shift is short and obviously doesn't require a great deal of strength. In fact, it looks effortless. I really like the look of my Hurst but perhaps I should consider a different shifter? What do you think?

One more question, I have noticed after driving my car for a while the stickshift will get warm, sometimes very, very, warm. I am not mechanically inclined so I wonder if it was installed correctly by the dealer mechanics? If it is cold or wet outside, the stick stays tolerable but on a warm day it gets very warm, or even hot. It doesn't seem right that the stick would get so warm/hot while driving in town. What do you think?
Go with this Shifter as it has a lot of Adjustments:

Smooth Action.





tigerhonaker
 

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Good call Terry, that one is still at the top of my list of future mods, after I get the Trans TSB done...



One thing that has to be kept in mind with short throw shifters, it is a simple matter of leverage. Any time a lever is shortened, the amount of work (in this case, shift effort) required to perform the same task is increased. Since the amount of effort the transmission needs to change gears cannot be changed, the change in effort on the shifter end increases. I.E. shorter shift length == greater shift effort.

I ran into all this when I was modifying the shifter in my old Taurus SHO. I thought the throw length was too long, so I created a short shifter for it. Unfortunately I went over board and went way too short (somehting on the order of 65% throw reduction) and shift effort went through the roof. Ended up having to take some 'shortness' out of it so it didn't feel like shifting a truck...
 

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Lightning said:
Good call Terry, that one is still at the top of my list of future mods, after I get the Trans TSB done...

One thing that has to be kept in mind with short throw shifters, it is a simple matter of leverage. Any time a lever is shortened, the amount of work (in this case, shift effort) required to perform the same task is increased. Since the amount of effort the transmission needs to change gears cannot be changed, the change in effort on the shifter end increases. I.E. shorter shift length == greater shift effort.

I ran into all this when I was modifying the shifter in my old Taurus SHO. I thought the throw length was too long, so I created a short shifter for it. Unfortunately I went over board and went way too short (somehting on the order of 65% throw reduction) and shift effort went through the roof. Ended up having to take some 'shortness' out of it so it didn't feel like shifting a truck...
That's why I love the stock shifter and I'm staying with it. Ironically it is about the same distance as my former British roadster of years ago. I have never missed a shift and the feel of the neutral slot (3/4) is very obvious unless one is used to driving a truck. It is very fluid and the length of throw is more than efficient for 2 lane road players. It is a finesse shifter, not a meat hook. IMO But it (mine) will also take power shifting any day of the week.

In contrast, I've had the Hurst in a 442 years ago and although it was shorter throw, it was as chunky as my current F150.

Plus, if it increases the force/leverage (from reduced travel) on the top end for the driver, what does the result of that force/leverage do to the synchro's on the bottom end of the stick??

Especially in this transmission which can be beat up pretty easy as reported by several over the years...
 

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^
^^^ +1 on the stock shifter. I do power shift fairly often and it has been spot on every time.
 

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I have nothing to compare to but here goes. My Hurst shifter that I have on my Bullitt is my first short throw that I have ever owned, and I love it.
I haven't missed 3rd since! I now shift like a young man.
 

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Have you changed the gearbox oil yet..? I noticed that my Hurst shift seemed a little lighter and smoother once the original oil was out, and some fresh Mercon V was put in. Maybe the new stuff is a bit lower in viscosity, and the gears aren't dragging as much.. don't know. My Hurst (actually the shift shafts) also loosened up a little after a couple weeks of driving.
 

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I have about 1000 miles on my Hurst and I have noticed that it shifter moves a lot easier now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well, the shifter has a little more than 5000 miles on it and during normal daily driving, it shifts just fine and I have no issues but when winding up the motor and trans it definitely takes effort. I still have the original trans fluid so I will look into that.

From what I hear you guys saying is with this brand of short throw, be prepared to manhandle the shifter during power shifting. No one commented on the heat issue, so if you have any comments in this regard please let me know.
 

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wmiles said:
well, the shifter has a little more than 5000 miles on it and during normal daily driving, it shifts just fine and I have no issues but when winding up the motor and trans it definitely takes effort. I still have the original trans fluid so I will look into that.

From what I hear you guys saying is with this brand of short throw, be prepared to manhandle the shifter during power shifting. No one commented on the heat issue, so if you have any comments in this regard please let me know.
Yeah my stock shifter ball gets warm after 2-3 hours constant driving time during the summer.
 

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wmiles said:
...From what I hear you guys saying is with this brand of short throw, be prepared to manhandle the shifter during power shifting. No one commented on the heat issue, so if you have any comments in this regard please let me know.
Because of a couple of higher rpm missed shifts with the stock unit, I went with the Hurst. Mine is still a little "iffy" with the Hurst (sometimes wants to lock out of second or third at high rpm), but I do enjoy the shorter throw and more precise feel. I really don't like the rattle, and yes, the Hurst handle gets pretty warm. I believe the tough shifting at high rpm is a Tremec 3650 issue, and not a shifter problem. I'm hoping that it may get better in time, as the shift hubs and shafts loosen up. It already seems much better than when I first got the car, 4000 miles ago. I recently changed the oil in mine, and think it did help a little. It sure couldn't hurt to get that first oil out, and I did see a few specs of metal in the original oil. Pretty common really, for a new-ish manual box that's missed a couple of shifts...
Anyway, I know that with this Tremec, I need to be more thoughtful when shifting, than with some other manual boxes I'm used to. It really does feel a bit crude. I also now know to fully warm it up, before trying to shift quickly at high rpm; the Tremec just doesn't like it, especially when cold.
 

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I have a Roush shifter in my car and installed a Hurst shifter in my friends car yesterday. The roush seems easier to shift maybe due to the handle I have and it shifts easy. I can shift with two fingers all the time. Too me both the Hurst and the Roush are good shifters and $100 cheaper than a MGW. I have a MGW in my 85 SVO and too me it was not worth the extra money. I have tried other fox body cars with the Steeda Tri AX, Pro 5.0 shifters, and ROush shifters. Too me they are just as good as the MGW and less money. just my opinion.
 
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