Mustang Bullitt Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I gave the engine bay of the Bullitt a spray over with Simplegreen degrease and then cleaned it off with a pressure washer.
After cleaning the remainer of the car went to move it only to find it was running on about 5 cylinders.
Sprayed the electrical system with CRC 66 Marine corrosion and moisture inhibitor with little result.
Let the motor idle for a while to warm up and hopefully dry out the electrical system.
Problem is I have not driven the car for weeks and the wife would not notice a thing except if the A/C or radio didn't work.
So there could have been a prior problem.
Don't have a reliable Ford workshop down here so I'm in a bind.
Have to go to Hawaii after Easter for a couple of days so should I buy a couple of spare coils and plugs?
Or is there something else I should look for?
Would appreciate some input here!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,988 Posts
First thing I would do is pull the coils and make sure I got the boots dry and make sure there isn't standing water in the spark plug holes. Make sure all of it's totally dry, put it back together, and hope for the best. Put a little dielectric grease on the inside of the boot at the plug end.

If this solves most of the problem, I would order eight new coil boots and replace them when you get a chance. You can buy them under the Standard Motor Parts name (part SPP-39) for much less than Motorcraft. With new boots, I put a little bit of dielectric grease around the boot where it fits to the coil, a little around where it seals to the cylinder head, and around where it fits around the spark plug. It certainly would not hurt to have a spare coil or two on hand for future emergencies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
marjenl said:
the wife would not notice a thing
Does this mean the wife has been having Unsupervised Visitation with the Bullitt? :shock: :shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I had this happen to my F150 on one of the cylinders after I sprayed the engine while washing it. Before you go buying any COPs, or pulling any plugs, try this. My check engine light came on allowing me to find out which cylinder was misfiring. An autoparts store can pull the code for you. Pull the COP on each cylinder that is misfiring. Take compressed air and force it into the plug well. This will blow the moisture out and away from the plug. Wear safety glasses. You may need to use a hair dryer to dry it out also. It only takes a small amount of moisture to make it misfire. When the engine gets hot, it create steam, which causes misfire. This worked for me. You can check the resistance on your COPs to make sure they are OK if need be. I am not sure how many ohms they should be, but someone on here might be able to tell you. A Haynes mannual has this information. None of my COPs were bad, it was only the moisture creating the problem. Good Luck
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top