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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, Eric really took good care of that car. As you could see from the picture of it in the service bay at the dealership. He's really bummed! Now he's saying he shouldn't have traded it. He was asking me if he should see if he could buy it back from the guy and if I thought it would be too much to fix it. I told him it looks like a lot of structural front end damage and I don't think it's worth trying to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Eric wanted to buy this car back and try to fix it. After he bought it and it was delivered to his house, he realized it had more damage than the insurance estimate showed. He should have tried to look at the car before he bought it back. He doesn't know if he's going to keep it and try to save it, or if he's going to end up parting it out. Poor kid! He should have just let it go. He's very emotional and his emotions got the best of him. I think if he knew someone that could do work pretty cheap for him, he could fix it over time and save it. But to pay full shop prices, it would be very costly. Like the guy that has done work for us before said, "Anything is fixable, just depends how much you want to spend.". If he decides to part it out, we will post on here to let everyone know.
 

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that's too bad. maybe he can do some of it himself and let the big stuff get done.
 

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Maybe finding a local car with a blown engine and bad seats and do a parts swap
 

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For some reasons the pictures are blocked on my computer. But, I bought a totaled Bullitt so let me tell you my experience. First off,how bad does he want to fix it? Can he picture himself driving it again? Is he one to finish what he sets his mind to? I towed my wreck to a body shop that told me I made a mistake buying it and forget about fixing it, it was a waste. My wife told me that shop was wrong and convinced me we could do it if I was determined. She was right. She stood by me for a year as I tore it down, saved our money to buy part by part and helped me find people who shared our vision and helped us put the car back together.

What are your son's skills? Does he have tools and a place to work on it? Is he willing to learn? Does he want the car fixed bad enough to drill out hundreds of sheet metal spot welds and tow the car from place to place to get the frame aligned, weld any supports if he can't weld, etc. etc? If he will always regret not trying to fix the car, then he should fix it. If the thought of working on it past midnight often doesn't appeal to him, forget it.

If he decides on the project, my advice is:

1) Get a Ford Mustang tech Manual.
2) Take the car apart piece by piece. (Don't mess with the unibody parts, leave that to a bodyshop unless you know what your doing. The tech manual will tell you what's unibody.) Take pictures as you disassemble. Tag and number all parts in ziplock bags. Don't throw out the old part until you put the new part on the car. Write wiring, fastener, left/right notes with magic marker on the old part. Helps for fitment comparison and reassembly.
3) Tag and number all wires and hoses on both sides of connections with painter's tape as you disconnect. Helps when you're re-wiring and can't remember what's what.
4) Make friends with e-bay, junkyards, ford websites, Craigslist and mustang clubs. Ask anybody and everybody for advice and offer beer for help. I asked around and checked the web and found local people with Bullitts who came over and let me look at a straight car to get measurements, check fasteners, wiring, drive train assembly, etc. They were into helping and invaluable.
5) Shop your pictures of your wreck to every body shop you can think of. Ask if they can help and or just give advice. I had two body shops who let me down, but we eventually found someone to help. We saved money by my removing all the damaged parts we could ourselves, towing the car to a body shop who straightened the unibody ($550) towed the car home, I then re-assembled the car including all the new body parts, in my garage and then got the car to a body man to paint.
6) Make friends with a mechanic who can diagnose computer stuff - diagnose/ reset airbag components, etc.

Its time consuming and not easy. There were a few times I drove through the neighborhood at night with a half finished car to get motivation, but if he wants it bad enough to persevere, it'll happen. Our bullitt's my daily driver now. I'm often driving to work smiling from ear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had down on the registry as #2588 totaled quite some time ago. Is your son's Bullitt black?

So it looks/sounds like that Bullitt has been in a couple of wrecks. :(
It was only totaled once a few months ago. Eric traded it for his Corvette, then very shortly after that the guy totaled it. Eric bought it back from that guy's insurance company and it has been sitting in his driveway under a cover ever since. He works too much to really work on it right now. Really, he shouldn't have bought it because he doesn't have the time to work on it, and he would have to have most of it done by someone else anyway because he doesn't have the skills or knowledge to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For some reasons the pictures are blocked on my computer. But, I bought a totaled Bullitt so let me tell you my experience. First off,how bad does he want to fix it? Can he picture himself driving it again? Is he one to finish what he sets his mind to? I towed my wreck to a body shop that told me I made a mistake buying it and forget about fixing it, it was a waste. My wife told me that shop was wrong and convinced me we could do it if I was determined. She was right. She stood by me for a year as I tore it down, saved our money to buy part by part and helped me find people who shared our vision and helped us put the car back together.

What are your son's skills? Does he have tools and a place to work on it? Is he willing to learn? Does he want the car fixed bad enough to drill out hundreds of sheet metal spot welds and tow the car from place to place to get the frame aligned, weld any supports if he can't weld, etc. etc? If he will always regret not trying to fix the car, then he should fix it. If the thought of working on it past midnight often doesn't appeal to him, forget it.

If he decides on the project, my advice is:

1) Get a Ford Mustang tech Manual.
2) Take the car apart piece by piece. (Don't mess with the unibody parts, leave that to a bodyshop unless you know what your doing. The tech manual will tell you what's unibody.) Take pictures as you disassemble. Tag and number all parts in ziplock bags. Don't throw out the old part until you put the new part on the car. Write wiring, fastener, left/right notes with magic marker on the old part. Helps for fitment comparison and reassembly.
3) Tag and number all wires and hoses on both sides of connections with painter's tape as you disconnect. Helps when you're re-wiring and can't remember what's what.
4) Make friends with e-bay, junkyards, ford websites, Craigslist and mustang clubs. Ask anybody and everybody for advice and offer beer for help. I asked around and checked the web and found local people with Bullitts who came over and let me look at a straight car to get measurements, check fasteners, wiring, drive train assembly, etc. They were into helping and invaluable.
5) Shop your pictures of your wreck to every body shop you can think of. Ask if they can help and or just give advice. I had two body shops who let me down, but we eventually found someone to help. We saved money by my removing all the damaged parts we could ourselves, towing the car to a body shop who straightened the unibody ($550) towed the car home, I then re-assembled the car including all the new body parts, in my garage and then got the car to a body man to paint.
6) Make friends with a mechanic who can diagnose computer stuff - diagnose/ reset airbag components, etc.

Its time consuming and not easy. There were a few times I drove through the neighborhood at night with a half finished car to get motivation, but if he wants it bad enough to persevere, it'll happen. Our bullitt's my daily driver now. I'm often driving to work smiling from ear.
Thank you for the advice!
 
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