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OFFICIAL BULLITT COIN RULES

A 'Coin Check' consists of a Challenge and a Response.

1. RULES:

A. The challenge is initiated by drawing your coin, holding it in the air by whatever means possible and state, scream, shout or otherwise verbally acknowledge that you are initiating a coin check. Another, but less vocal method is to firmly place it on the bar, table, or floor (this should produce an audible noise which can be easily heard by those being challenged, but try not to leave a permanent imprint). If you accidentally drop your coin and it makes an audible sound upon impact, then you have just "accidentally" initiated a coin check. (This is called paying the price for improper care of your coin.)

B. The response consists of all those persons being challenged drawing their coin in a like manner (other organizational coins are invalid). You must produce a BULLITT coin.

C. If you are challenged and are unable to properly respond, you must buy a round of drinks for the challenger and the group being challenged.

D. If everyone being challenged responds in the correct manner, the challenger must buy a round of drinks for all those people they challenged.

E. Failure to buy a round is a despicable crime and will require that you turn-in your Coin to the issuing agency.

2. WHEN – WHERE:

A. Coin checks are permitted, ANY TIME, ANY PLACE'.

3. EXCEPTIONS:

A. There are no exceptions to the rules. They apply to those clothed or unclothed. At the time of the challenge you are permitted one step and an arms reach to locate your coin. If you still cannot reach it -- SORRY ABOUT THAT!

4. A COIN IS A COIN:

A. Coins attached on belt buckles are considered "belt buckles".

B. Coins on key chains are considered "key chains."

C. Coins placed in a "holder/clasp" and worn around the neck like a necklace are valid and are considered a coin.

5. ADVICE:

A. Never, ever be caught without your BULLITT Coin!

History of the Coin

During World War I, American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy men attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war. In one squadron a wealthy lieutenant ordered medallions struck in solid bronze carrying the squadron emblem for every member of his squadron. He himself carried his medallion in small leather pouch around his neck.

Shortly after acquiring the medallions, the pilot's aircraft was severely damaged by ground fire. He was force to land behind enemy lines and was immediately captured by a German patrol. In order to discourage his escape, the Germans took all of his personal identification except for the small leather pouch around his neck. In the meantime, he was taken to a small French town near the front. Taking advantage of a bombardment that night, he escaped. However, he was without personal identification.

He succeeded in avoiding German patrols and reached the front lines. With great difficulty, he crossed no-man's land. Eventually, he stumbled onto a French outpost. Unfortunately, the French in this sector had been plagued by saboteurs. They sometimes masqueraded as civilians and wore civilian clothes. Not recognizing the young pilot's American accent, the French thought him a saboteur and made ready to execute him. Just in time, he remembered his leather pouch containing the medallion. He showed the medallion to his would-be executioners. His French captors recognized the squadron insignia on the medallion and delayed long enough for him to confirm his identity. Instead of shooting him, they gave him a bottle of wine.

Back at his squadron, it became a tradition to ensure that all members carried their medallion or coin at all times. This was accomplished through a challenge in the following manner: a challenger would ask to see the coin. If the challenged could not produce his coin, he was required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged him. If the challenged member produced his coin, the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.


Don't have one?

Get it here:

http://www.bullittclub.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?topic=4465&forum=21
 

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Very cool, Wade and good sales pitch! heehee

:grin:
 

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Wow, glad I ordered mine!! :grin:
 

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Damn Wade, I've got to carry around 2 coins, My CPO coin and the Bullitt coin.... I wondered if Coin rule would happen. But it's fun rule, I like free beer!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tell me about it! I need a box to carry all the unit coins I have. They never let me forget it either.
 

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Wade,
Don't mean to sound negative, but the coin I carry means alot more to me than the Bullitt coin. Yes it's a very nice coin to display, but that about it as far as my Bullitt coin goes. I think if you understand the moral of the coin story you told you'll also understand that you don't carry a box of coins, one for every occasion. There is one very special coin you earn and are given in order to bring you into a very special group of people. Not something you buy because you own a car. Again I am sorry to make this sound like I'm shooting down your idea, but this whole coin check is very close to home for me and I for one take it seriously. I just don't think a Bullitt coin check is a good idea. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
5150bullitt,

I've been in the Air Force for over 16 years and have one coin that I earned through blood, sweat and tears and it means everything to me. I too know the meaning of the rules and their history. My Flight Engineer coin IS the only one that I carry AT ALL TIMES. However, many units give coins to indiviuals and they are expected to produce THAT coin while in the company of other unit members. That IS current military tradition (at least in Air Force flying units).

I posted the rules and history as something fun for non-military types. I consider this club as a unit and will be proud to carry the bullitt coin whenever attending bullitt functions. I'm sorry this coin is so trivial to you and did not mean to be-little any other coin/coins you cherrish.
 

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Wade,
I do believe you hold the coin tradition true to yourself and your unit. Now don't you feel that is something special? Like you say your blood and sweat earned you that. Then that being the case why would you make a game out of it for just anyone to play. My point is that the coin check should be a matter of pride and honor for those who earn it. Not for a novelty coin. Again don't get me wrong I think the Bullitt coin is a great thing, but come on do you really think it has the same meaning.
 

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Hey Wade,
I don't mean to get under your skin with whole coin thing. I thank you for comming up with the Bullitt coin and look forward to getting mine. I was just giving my opinion. And I'm sure you know what they say about opinions don't you? They're just like a#*holes, everyone has one. Please don't take the whole thing personal. It just kinda shocked me at first, if you know what I mean. Take it easy and keep em flying.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
5150BULLITT,

OK, No hard feelings, Just thought it might help solidify some bullitthead comradery. thats all. Keep the shiny side up!

I still didn't recieve any pics last night. I was hoping the guy making the coins would e-mail me pictures of the finished product since he supposedly shipped them yesterday. There is a 16 hour time difference. Maybe I'll see it tonight.
 

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I hope so, I'll keep checking back for the pics, as long as I can still find the post!

I love your new sig, Wade!
 
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