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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,
I see many posts about oil separators on the PCV hoses of the 08/09 Bullitts.

What about the 01s? Do we need an oil separator? Is there something different about the 08/09 Bullitt engines?

There are PCV hoses on both sides of the 01 engine and the passenger side is more difficult to reach. What is a good set up to avoid oil mist intake on the 01s?
 

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It is a more known problem in supercharged cars. I just went to Home depot and bought one instead of buying a steeda one that is like 80 bucks. I think I paid like 19.00 for everything I needed. I just caped the intake and drained to the bottum of the car through the wheel well. Nothing ever comes out anyway becauce the oil seperater catches everything.
 

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blmarlow said:
It is a more known problem in supercharged cars. I just went to Home depot and bought one instead of buying a steeda one that is like 80 bucks. I think I paid like 19.00 for everything I needed. I just caped the intake and drained to the bottum of the car through the wheel well. Nothing ever comes out anyway becauce the oil seperater catches everything.
Are you saying you hooked the inlet of the seperator to the rocker cover and the other end of the seperator you just have going to the wheel well and not to the intake manifold?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Bruce,
What exactly did you buy at Home Depot? What department?

Did you install it only on one side? Which side(s)?
 

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If you are going to do the DIY Home Depot oil separator, it needs to go between the PCV, (located on the passenger side) and the intake manifold. Make sure the separator's in and out's are correct. Out is to the intake, so the arrow, (most have arrows) is pointing from the PCV to the intake. You should mount the separator vertical. Have to watch these type of filters though a lot of time the drain valve on the bottom is NOT air tight. I sealed mine up and just unscrew the bowl to empty the oil.

So far the debate against the DIY HD separator is, (but not limited to LOL)
1. The separator is not rated for oil
2. The separator does not filter oil
3. The separator leaks air
4. The separator is only rated for up to 125 degrees

My observations so far.
1. There is oil in the compressor air and that is what these are designed to stop. Have not read where anybody running one has disintegrated. You would think it would be common with the number of people installing these.
2. It will block oil, because there is oil in mine.
3. Yes it can leak, seal it up somehow.
4. Again , have not read where anybody running one has disintegrated. If mine lasts through the Arizona summer then I am not going to worry about the 125 degree rating, (I think that may have something to do with efficiency and running at like 100+ PSI also. I have not found a good answer to that one yet)
 

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Mid Life Crisis #388 said:
If you are going to do the DIY Home Depot oil separator, it needs to go between the PVC, (located on the passenger side) and the intake manifold. Make sure the separator's in and out's are correct. Out is to the intake, so the arrow, (most have arrows) is pointing from the PCV to the intake. You should mount the separator vertical. Have to watch these type of filters though a lot of time the drain valve on the bottom is NOT air tight. I sealed mine up and just unscrew the bowl to empty the oil.

So far the debate against the DIY HD separator is, (but not limited to LOL)
1. The separator is not rated for oil
2. The separator does not filter oil
3. The separator leaks air
4. The separator is only rated for up to 125 degrees

My observations so far.
1. There is oil in the compressor air and that is what these are designed to stop. Have not read where anybody running one has disintegrated. You would think it would be common with the number of people installing these.
2. It will block oil, because there is oil in mine.
3. Yes it can leak, seal it up somehow.
4. Again , have not read where anybody running one has disintegrated. If mine lasts through the Arizona summer then I am not going to worry about the 125 degree rating, (I think that may have something to do with efficiency and running at like 100+ PSI also. I have not found a good answer to that one yet)
Air compressor separators are designed to trap the water that is compressed out of the air in the tank, so that water does not enter your tools (air ratchet, nail gun, paint gun, etc.). That's why you drop oil in your tools frequently, to offset any potential rust. And that's why you open the drain on the bottom of your compressor tank each time you are done rather than just letting the air leak out of the air hose. Have you seen the water that sprays out?

While you may not want to agree with Brett at BKU because he sells a different unit, he says he knows of the cheaper ones having screens sucked into intake manifolds, the leaks allowing unfiltered air into your engine, and improper cfm causing excessive crankcase pressure to cause cam cover gasket leaks. I can't remember if these issues were only on SC. He only sells these for $29 so I don't think he would exaggerate his experiences as a race shop. But the margins on $29 can't be much and in the end, its only a bit more to have a proper oil separator than the Home Depot route. IMO

Thanx for the pm Larry on that other issue.
 

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The design of the separator takes oil and or water and uses centrifugal force to sling it against the outside of the bowl. The fluid condenses and collects and then flows to the bottom of the bowl. No way around this, that is how it is designed.

Excessive crankcase pressure can happen if you RESTRICT (nearly block) the factory flow. (or your rings are worn so bad that blowby is way up) Too much pressure, (or low air flow) is when you start blowing gaskets, or even send your dipstick out the engine. (mess to clean up also) ANYTHING, no matter who makes it, if you put it inline will restrict and reduce airflow. No way around this one either.

Listen to what is said, he says that the OEM setup OVERFLOWS the PCV system and creates MORE oil vapor. And that may be I am not debating that!!!!!!!
To help combat the excess oil vapor he says he flows the separator, (This reads as adds more restriction to the system).

He may be 100% correct!

I am not debating any claims by BKU or any other vendor, only stating my personal observations. I am not trying to sell anything either, unless you want to buy some 2001 OEM gray valve caps LOL.
 

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By both sides you mean the drivers and passenger side rocker cover hoses are T-ed together and from there into the separator? And then the outlet of the separator goes to the ground?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well!

So by this method, we go back to the old days with nothing more than a breather tube with a separator attached.

No positive crankcase ventilation. Right?
 

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i know alot of people that have made them and idk how efficient the home made ones are really but they will catch oil either way..here's a picture of the one that i will get http://media.photobucket.com/image/steph%2527s catch can/dlowum/oilsep2.jpg its from steph's fabrication and it is a bit pricey... you also have to rig up the AN lines and fittings yourself but they'll tell you what you need..you can also just use breathers for the valve covers as seen here http://www.2005stang.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10325/normal_P1050006.JPG so you dont have to vent them back into the manifold
 

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Greddy makes a good one also and megan racing has a compariable one. If you look hard enough many companies out there make one it just takes time to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have installed (in about one minute) the JLT unit to the passenger side cam cover by pulling out the PCV valve, inserting the unit and plugging the PCV valve (with hose) into the JLT unit.

The JLT unit has a wire mesh that collects the oil droplets from the ventilated gasses and simply allows the oil to drain back into the cam cover when the engine is turned off.

Just give the interior of the unit a spray with carb cleaner every few months.
 

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PhotoRick said:
I have installed (in about one minute) the JLT unit to the passenger side cam cover by pulling out the PCV valve, inserting the unit and plugging the PCV valve (with hose) into the JLT unit.

The JLT unit has a wire mesh that collects the oil droplets from the ventilated gasses and simply allows the oil to drain back into the cam cover when the engine is turned off.

Just give the interior of the unit a spray with carb cleaner every few months.
That is the one I bought and am running on the van in front of the oil separator. I will have a good idea how well it works once the van has some miles on it.
The Van was collecting 3cc's of oil per 650 miles.
 

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After installing the Eaton, I was having a puff of smoke after startup. I finally figured out that it was blowing vapor into the inlet tube under boost. It appears that most PCV valves do not seal off the reverse flow when boost is applied, the crankcase gets pressurized blowing vapor out the inlet. I checked a bunch of PCV valves and none sealed very well.

My answer was to add a vacuum check valve from a brake booser to the hose between the intake and PCV. The check seals off all flow to the crankcase when boosted. My throttle body and inlet are now clean with no oil buildup. My smoke issue is gone too.

Of course this only applies to SC cars......
 

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Yes that is correct, the hose to the inlet tube will have flow from the crank case to the air inlet, under heavy throttle.

What you did was cut your crankcase air flow in half (under heavy throttle) by effectively shutting this source off.
 

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Why the Eaton Setup ???

Bullitt 5.4 said:
After installing the Eaton, I was having a puff of smoke after startup. I finally figured out that it was blowing vapor into the inlet tube under boost. It appears that most PCV valves do not seal off the reverse flow when boost is applied, the crankcase gets pressurized blowing vapor out the inlet. I checked a bunch of PCV valves and none sealed very well.

My answer was to add a vacuum check valve from a brake booser to the hose between the intake and PCV. The check seals off all flow to the crankcase when boosted. My throttle body and inlet are now clean with no oil buildup. My smoke issue is gone too.

Of course this only applies to SC cars......
Is there any particular reason you chose the Eaton setup over a Kenne Bell, if I may ask?
 

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I ran one on #2580 for a while and took it off.
You have to empty the can on the seperator when it's half full, which was daily for me. be aware of the extra maintenance this mod will require.
I tried to plumb a return line to drain the caught oil back but couldn't get it to work. Removing it was easier.
 
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