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Discussion Starter #1
Replaced the IAC and EGR valve because of a vacuum leak my car still experiences stumbling issues. A local reapir shop burned me in the wallet and still didn't fix the problem. They said my car wasn't showing any codes.
Finally today the service engine soon light came on and I took it by Autozone. "Misfire in cylinder #1". I'm going to change the plugs and finally buy new cops. I'm crossing my fingers, hoping this resolves the issue, and I can feel better about driving my Bullitt.
Marcus lead me in a great direction with RPM Outlet. They have great prices on COPS. They're around $23.00 a piece. Here's a few questions:

What other websites have good deals on parts?
Besides the Ford plugs what others are good for a stock car?
Which auto parts store will loan me the tools for the job?
Do I fork over an extra $100.00 for the better boots that go on the coils?

Thanks in advance for any input or suggestions.
 

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Buying new boots for new cops would be a waste. I'd say you will gain absolutely nothing by doing so. I'd use the stock motorcraft platinum plugs. I use copper plugs, but I change them frequently. As far as the tools, you should just buy a nice $100 socket set and long extension set. Spend the money that you would have spent on the boots on this instead. This is stuff you can use in the future, not just for plugs. The only thing I can thing of, you will need to figure out how to get an air compressor to blow out the plug holes. I would try to find a friend that has one rather than bothering with renting one. Maybe you get lucky and he has a torque wrench too.

Drive down here to Florida and I'll do the plug/cop change for you :D Seriously, once you see how easy it is, you'll wonder why you haven't done it before.

I know that I have typed all this before, but I'll mention it again. I do recommend buying about a foot of transmission cooler or fuel hose. Use it to slip over the plug to start threading it into the hole. The reason for this, the hose will slip long before any possibility of cross-threading. I use anti-sieze, some don't. A little goes a long way, just a little smear on the threads is plenty. You don't want to get it on the shoulder of the plug or the electrode. Just a very little on the threads.

As far as tightening the plugs, I can't really describe what is tight enough and what is too tight. You can do it without a torque wrench, but I would recommend using one the first time. One other problem is that ft-lb torque wrenches are notorious for being inaccurate on the bottom of the scale. An in-lb torque wrench that goes up to about 250 in-lbs would be a far better choice here. I set mine to 168 in-lbs. But good luck finding one. I would buy one of these before ever wasting my time trying to find a rental. Harbor Freight might have one for under $30. I have an SK, but it was about 80 bucks. Something like this would work and being 3/8" drive you don't have to worry about stepping it up to fit your 3/8" sockets and extensions like you would with a 1/4" drive torque wrench. http://www.toolsource.com/click-style-torque-wrench-20200-inlb-p-96588.html All that said, a ft-lb wrench would be more useful for other things. If you bought a good one, you'd probably be ok with it.

This is a good investment too http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00943322000P?vName=Tools&keyword=spark+plug+socket
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good recommendations. Thanks!
 

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I can loan you the tools to change the plugs yourself, BUT I leave Monday in the AM for two weeks. Call me after 5pm tomorrow (Sunday), and I will see about meeting you. I have the sockets and torque wrenches. I am currently using copper plugs right now. I will PM you my number.
 

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Do you change the plugs on a completely cold engine? My air compressor is in a friends garage that is a 2 minute drive from my house. I really need to change my plugs this weekend, but all the tools I need to use are in his garage. I can imagine it would make a difference on aluminum heads.
 

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Yes, change them cold.
 

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I don't change them when it's hot, that's for sure. But stone cold is usually not possible. I usually end up driving the car to my shop right before I change the plugs. It happens to be about two minutes away. Mine does not get hot enough to require a long cool down. I usually work in an oil change before, and maybe give myself a half hour before starting the plugs. If it's a little hotter, I put a fan up on a stool and let it blow over the top of the engine. By the time I start putting the new plugs in, it really is barely warm.
 
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