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OK, it's only 2 weeks old and I'm not really into breaking the rear end out yet. Really haven't seen a road condition for it anyway.

My question is, when I leave the TC turned on and practice high rpm launches, it smokes both rears and makes for a pretty good launch. How does turning it off help? Do I need to hit some railroad tracks just to make sure the TC works?
 
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<TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
On 2001-11-07 12:12, kfengler wrote:
The way I understand how the TC works is this: As long as the car tracks straight, doesn't want to go sideways, it will smoke the tires. But if you upset the balance, getting sideways, uneven traction conditions, etc. then the TC will take over.

I tried it out when we had some rain, I felt the car go slightly sideways, then felt a lose of power...

...anyone else??

_________________
Karl Fengler

http://stangnet.cardomain.com/id/kfengler http://community.webshots.com/user/kfengler1

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: kfengler on 2001-11-07 12:13 ]</font>
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

That's it,in a nut shell..... :-B
 

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Trying going around a corner at an intersection and nailing it. The engine will shut down immediately. It's quite dramatic, especially if your not paying attention.
 

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Your right Justin, If someone wants to test TC, just goose it in a corner, and that ugly green light will come on, and your car will immediately slow for a second or two, and then take off again. It's an awful feeling, especially when you not expecting it.
 

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Here's how I understand it based on info from the Owner's Guide:

TC is a "driver aid" which makes the Bullitt easier to handle primarily on snow, ice and gravel roads. It operates by detecting and controlling wheel spin. An interesting note to point out is that TC borrows many of the electronic and mechanical elements present in the ABS system. Wheel-speed sensors allow excess rear wheel spin to be detected by the TC portion of the ABS computer. The excessive wheel spin is controlled by "automatically applying and releasing the rear brakes in conjunction with engine torque reductions." (engine torque is realized via the fully electronic spark and fuel injection systems) The whole process happens several times per second. Hope this helps!

Steve (Bullitt_Buyer's Husband)
DHG #4930
 
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