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I've been a little confused as to what constitutes HID, the benefits of Xenon, and whether I could get Xenon replacement bulbs without that (IMHO) ricey blue coating.

What I read was quite an eye opener regarding use of the blue xenon bulbs. I'll let you folks make up your own minds, but I recommend the reading.

Blue Xenon info, general headlight tech info.


Joe
 

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Hi Joe,
Interesting, I think he is knocking the cheap $15.00 headlight sets that looked like they were dipped in blue paint. I would have to agree there that you will be getting less light. I went with the PIAA's awhile ago and I don't think that it is the placebo effect that makes me think they are better than the factory. Just for the heck of it when I changed my bulbs I took a photo before and after and you can clearly see the PIAA's are MUCH whiter.
http://www.quicksurf.com/ths/Bullitt/BUPG16/
Now for you camera buffs out there. I was not planning to document the change and I did not keep the exposure setting the same on both pictures to make it completely fair. However because of automoatic exposure what we end up with in real life, the original bulbs photo is probably one step brighter than in real life and the new ones photo is one step darker than in real life. SO the actual difference is even more dramatic than what you see in the picture. This explains why you can see more detail in the shadows of the first than in the second. It was my lack of planning that caused this but you can still see the majority of the difference, just don't compare whats in the shadows its not accurate. One day when I am totally bored maybe I will swap them back and do a property photo.
 

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Hi Mid-life.

Believe me, I'm not trying to argue with you at all. I think it was your post that made me go hunting, because when I went to price the bulbs after reading it, I got so confused by all the marketing stuff that the different brands used.

I got a little bent out of shape when someone dismissed Amsoil for not being technically fully SAE certified, because I have full faith in the quality of the Amsoil product, and have read enough data about the tests their oil goes through to believe their claims. My point being that please don't think I'm being argumentative here by posting these particular quotes. I've seen some of the bulbs out there, and to my eye they also appeared whiter and presumably brighter. But, having an 8 hour 12-8 shift gave me plenty of time to read everything this guy wrote, and I came away from it less willing to believe my eyes.

From the link: (Rude tone his, not mine.)

<TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
It is a mistaken notion that "whiter" and "yellower" qualities in the white light of a headlamp have any direct link to the amount or usability of the light. PIAA capitalizes on that mistaken notion to sell their bulbs. The "higher light color temperature" trumpeted by PIAA is created by a purplish-tinted glass bulb globe. It's not a dichroic coating like the "diamond blue" junk, but it is a tint, and as such physically must subtract from the available light. Remember, color temperature is independent of the amount of light, and there is absolutely *zero* evidence that light of a higher color temperature is better than light of a lower color temperature for driver performance at night. A 4-watt flashlight bulb dipped in the purple coating applied to Piaa "Superwhite" bulbs would look "whiter", but produce less light. And so it is with these headlamp bulbs.

People seem to have the notion that the eye is more sensitive to light of higher color temperature. This is probably as a result of claims made by car salesmen trying to sell HID headlamps more than anything else; it's false. The eye is not more sensitive to the blue cast created by the subject bulbs. There have been several studies done showing improved driver performance (due to improved vision at night) with headlamps of LOWER color temperature (less blue, more yellow). Color perception is much better under lower color temperatures (within the IEC "white" boundaries, of course), and the acuity of the human eye is really quite lousy under light colors that even begin to approach "blue".
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

<TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>When a bulb with such a modified filament stack is placed in a headlamp, the different dimensions of the filament alter the beam pattern. In most US-specification headlamps, what this does is reduce the size of the central "hot spot" of the beam and put more light in it, while taking away light above, below, to the left and to the right of the hot spot. Then the PIAA marketeer comes up with his light meter, sticks it in the hot spot of the beam, and says "Nifty! The hot spot is almost as bright as it would be with an 85W bulb!" and rushes off to order-up a new batch of boxes festooned with "55W = 85W" banners. Then Mr. Consumer comes along, plunks-down some $70 (!!) for a pair of these bulbs, puts them in, and though his headlamps look "whiter", he has just screwed himself.</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

<TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>The output spectrum of halogen headlamp bulbs includes *very* little light in the blue frequency range. These blue bulbs have a filter coating on them that allows only the blue frequencies through the filter. Because very little light is produced by a halogen bulb in this range in the first place, it is only this very small amount--a tiny fraction of the total amount of light produced by a halogen bulb filament--that ever reaches the road. This can be confirmed this with a good-quality non-chromosensitive light meter; even a very apparently-bright blue bulb actually throws very little light.

Recent tests by the US Department of Transportation's Office of Crash Avoidance Standards found that a standard-wattage 9004-type blue headlamp bulb reduced the road lighting ability of a standard headlamp by 67%, and increased glare for oncoming and preceeding trafic by 33%.
</BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

Man, believe me when I say I'm not trying to change your mind. But before you dismissed these articles, I wanted you to see the specific parts where he talks about whiteness, blue light, and PIAA.

No poking with a stick intended,
Joe
 

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Hey Joe,
No problem I did not take your post as be argumentative, just looking for and sharing information is how I took it. The PIAA's were expensive but I think they are defiently worth it and they are better for me than the factory. I just wanted to clear that part about the pic up so people could judge it fairly. Guess I should add the same info to the web page, that or redo the photo. Guess in fairness I will redo the photo and put the originals back in. What they heck, do it right the first time and I would not be doing it again. A side note, this all started after I installed the fog lights and I could not tell if they were on or not.....
Started researching lights on the web and ended up buying the PIAA's for the headlights. Then when I put the fog lamps on they looked yellow compared to the headlights. Recently bought a pair of Xenon's for the fog lamps and now they match the head lights for whiteness.
 
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